From the Kitchen Table to the Palm of Your Hand

Catan is my casual game of choice mainly because it is a board game that is adapted to your phone.  This game has been a crucial entity for family game nights between immediate and extended family.  This game is 100% strategy based and not only tests one’s strategy forming skills, but also one’s persuasion and manipulation skills.  In the game, you are given resource cards, depending on where you build, and with those cards you continue to build upon your territory until you reach the point limit.  The persuasive attribute to the game is that you can trade these cards to other players.  That is the major reason why I thoroughly enjoy Catan, because, if you are persuasive enough, you can easily have an advantage over your opponents.  However, the phone version of the game, unless played online, is played against AIs.  This virtually takes that component out of the game so your strategic skills must be up to standards.  This game is however, is great to play on the go.  Due to the genre of casual games, this game allows you to play and leave as you please without any penalty.  The only time when you cannot do that is if you play online versus other people.

The conversion of a board game to interactive video games is one that has always intrigued me: in particular, the way marketing agents sell old topics as new and improved gaming experiences. When companies do this, do they abandon the board game component of the game?  Meaning, do they only update and add additions to the mobile game?  Or do they still continue to try out new plans by means of the board game?  There are numerous examples of this dynamic in the business world; for example, both Risk and the Game of Life are accessible through a board game as well as a mobile game.  I hope there will be a section in our class about this very dynamic.

(This is the layout of the board which mirrors the board game.)

(This is an in-game example of trading resources.)